Penn State Preview: Maryland

Jayson Oweh and the Nittany Lions look for their first (Photo by Steve Manuel)

Each week, we’ll tell you what to expect, what to keep an eye, and where and when you can catch the Nittany Lions this football season.

Game details: vs. Maryland, 3:30 p.m. kickoff, broadcast on BTN.

Venue: Beaver Stadium, where Penn State enjoys a 23-1 advantage over Maryland in the all-time series.

Weather forecast (via Accuweather): High of 71 degrees and sunny.

All-time series: Penn State leads 40-2-1.

Last meeting (2019): The Nittany Lions bulldozed the Terrapins 59-0 in College Park, where the school closed classes leading up to the Friday night game.

Throwback classic (2015): Penn State outlasted Maryland 31-30 at M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. We looked back at the victory this week on the blog.

The lead: It’s fairly easy to imagine Penn State winning its six remaining games and qualifying for another attractive bowl. That journey begins Saturday against the Terrapins, who the Nittany Lions have outscored 163-6 over the last three years. Maryland upset Minnesota last week in College Park, though struggled mightily in losing 43-3 to Northwestern in the season opener.

Penn State wins if: the Nittany Lions avoid mistakes that flip the field. It’s difficult to see Maryland keeping pace Saturday, so as long as Penn State forces the Terps to work for all their points, there’s a good chance this one will be locked up going into the fourth quarter.

Maryland wins if: the Terps’ quarterback, Taulia Tagovailoa, can find gaps in the Penn State secondary. Both Indiana and Ohio State scored 30-plus points against the Nittany Lions, though those are two ranked teams with explosive offenses. That doesn’t describe Maryland, though if the Terps can find way to gain chunk plays down the field, that gives them a shot.

Count on: Penn State running the ball plenty. Maryland is last in the Big Ten and is one of the worst teams nationally in rush defense, allowing nearly 300 yards per game. The Nittany Lions’ backfield is without some of its stars, though there’s still plenty of talent thanks to the impressive job that the staff has done in recruiting.

Keep an eye on: Jahan Dotson. The junior wide receiver has elevated his play early on, establishing himself as Sean Clifford’s top target for wideouts (both Dotson with 929 and standout tight end Pat Freiermuth with 981 are within reach of 1,000 career receiving yards). Through the season’s first two games, Dotson has tallied 238 receiving yards, the best two-game start for a Penn State receiver in six years. 

Trivia tidbit: Clifford is tied for the Big Ten lead with six passing touchdowns.

Penn State’s Most Memorable Teams: 1994

Penn State running back Ki-Jana Carter sprints to a touchdown in Penn State’s opening drive at the 1995 Rose Bowl against Oregon. (Photo by Penn State)

Editor’s note: Throughout the season, we’re looking at Penn State’s most memorable teams from the past 40 years. Up next is the season when Penn State returned to the Rose Bowl after seven decades.

John Black asked a perfectly reasonable question. Unfortunately, nobody provided an answer.

For 100-plus years, Penn State football had competed as an independent, though that all changed when the University joined the Big Ten in the early 1990s and the football program began conference play in 1993.

A year later, the team bulldozed its way to a perfect record. After demolishing Michigan State 59-31 in the regular season finale, Joe Paterno and Co. accepted a bid to the Rose Bowl, perhaps the sport’s most prestigious game and one in which he had never previously coached.

In his biography of Paterno, Michael O’Brien wrote that the legendary coach (understandably) had ambition to play in the Rose Bowl, and that it was something he’d think about when he was alone, walking in the woods in back of his house. 

So, Penn State prepared to play in it is first Rose Bowl since 1923, meaning that for the first time in its illustrious history, The Football Letter headed to Pasadena — creator Ridge Riley started the publication in the late 1930s — where editor Black covered his first Rose Bowl. Black would return for two more trips, to cap off the 2008 and 2016 seasons.

Though as Black wrote in his lead to that game’s edition: “The first time is always the best.”

Penn State upended Oregon, with Ki-Jana Carter galloping for an 83-yard touchdown on the game’s opening play from scrimmage. The Nittany Lions collected a 38-20 victory for Paterno’s fifth unbeaten, untied season. And yet, as players, alumni, and fans painfully know, no national title. Not even a share.

Black wrote:

“As recently as 1991, undefeated Miami and undefeated Washington were declared co-champions. The year before, Georgia Tech and Colorado shared the title. Why is an undefeated, untied Penn State squad an outcast for the fourth time since 1968? What was possibly wrong with the performance of the 1968, 1969, 1973, and 1994 Penn State teams?

Coach Joe Paterno said the 1994 Nittany Lions ‘proved to everyone in the country that they are as worthy of a national championship as anyone else.’

With no opportunity for the teams to settle the issue on the gridiron, Nebraska, which was also undefeated and untied in 1994, deserves a share of the national title. Certainly Tom Osborne, one of the most respected coaches in college football, has long deserved a national championship ring.

But so do the 1994 Nittany Lions.”

He was right, of course. Though not receiving a share of the championship that they certainly deserved doesn’t make that team any less legendary.

The Penn Stater magazine editor Ryan Jones wrote an extensive oral history on the team, aptly titled, “Legends of ’94,” and you can also read that story on the blog.

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Penn State Preview: Ohio State

Penn State welcomes Ohio State to Beaver Stadium on Saturday, with kickoff set for 7:30 p.m. on ABC (Photo by Steve Manuel)

Each week, we’ll tell you what to expect, what to keep an eye, and where and when you can catch the Nittany Lions this football season.

Game details: No. 18/17 Penn State vs. No. 3/3 Ohio State, 7:30 p.m. kickoff, broadcast on ABC.

Venue: Beaver Stadium, where Penn State boasts an all-time record of 297-74 (80 percent winning percentage).

Weather forecast (via Accuweather): High of 46 degrees with a mix of sun and clouds.

All-time series: Ohio State leads 20-14.

Last meeting (2019): The Buckeyes earned a 28-17 victory in Columbus.

Throwback classic (2005): This one truly is a classic. Penn State prevailed in one of the most memorable games ever at Beaver Stadium, winning 17-10 over sixth-ranked Ohio State (the Nittany Lions were ranked sixteenth). The victory propelled Penn State toward a Big Ten title, with the Nittany Lions narrowly missing out on playing for the national championship. We spoke with former defensive back Calvin Lowry (2002-05), who picked off a pass in the second quarter to set up a Penn State touchdown. Lowry recalled what it was like playing in the big, and you can check out that story on the blog.

The lead: A sold-out White Out against Ohio State on Halloween, can you imagine the scene?

Penn State wins if: the Nittany Lions both establish the ground game in a big-time way. This will be an extra challenge with the news this week that Noah Cain will miss the rest of the season, coupled with Journey Brown out indefinitely. Still, there’s plenty of talent for Penn State to call upon, and Devyn Ford especially will be needed, as he’s the most experienced running back. Sean Clifford can (and probably will) contribute, as the signal-caller led Penn State in rushing a week ago with 119 yards.

Ohio State wins if: the Buckeyes give Justin Fields room to both run and throw. A former Penn State commit, Fields is one of the leading Heisman Trophy finalists and is incredibly effective with his arm and his legs. If he’s able to impact the game in both areas, that’ll give Ohio State an advantage.

Count on: the Penn State linebackers stepping up. With Jesse Luketa set to miss the first half after being called for targeting in last week’s loss at Indiana, players such as Lance Dixon will be called on to help limit the Buckeyes as much as possible.

Keep an eye on: the S-Zone. Thanks to the Lion Ambassadors, the Penn State Alumni Association’s student alumni corps, the S-Zone will be a banner stretching across 800 seats above the team tunnel at Beaver Stadium. Through a partnership with the Penn State Alumni AssociationBlue & White Society, and Lion Ambassadors, the banner will honor the Class of 2020 and Class of 2021 and feature the names of members of those classes. We’re excited to unveil the banner this weekend and for all Penn Staters to see it.

Trivia tidbit: This game has been played incredibly close recently, with a total of 16 points deciding the last four games between the Nittany Lions and Buckeyes.

From The Archives: Penn State V. Ohio State (2005)

Penn State upended Ohio State 17-10 in the 2005 White Out, widely regarded as one of the most iconic games in Beaver Stadium history.

Calvin Lowry told himself that if he had another chance, he’d create a big play.

He did, and he did.

First, the setup: Penn State and Ohio State were battling in what turned out to be one of the most memorable games in Beaver Stadium history — the 2005 White Out. The Buckeyes were ranked No. 6, with the Nittany Lions No. 16. A win would likely catapult Penn State toward a Big Ten championship and possible national title.

Pretty high stakes.

Penn State led 7-3 a little more than five minutes into the second quarter, when Lowry experienced a case of deja vu. Only this time with a different result.

He picked off Buckeye quarterback Troy Smith on third and long on the Buckeyes’ side of the field, nearly returning the pick for a touchdown. He was tackled a few yards short of the goal line, and Penn State scored a few plays later.

“That interception, they had run that play earlier in the game,” Lowry said. “I had seen it and I had been one step short of making the play previously. I talked myself into it: ‘If it happens again, I’m going to make that play.’ Ultimately it happened. I saw it, it kind of slo-moed (slow-motion), if people could believe that. Then, being five yards short of returning it for a touchdown was the biggest hiccup I had. I would’ve loved to have seen how loud the stadium really could have got if I ran that in there.”

You can check out the video above for an abbreviated version of the game, with Lowry’s interception starting around the 4:30 mark.

The Nittany Lions won 17-10 en route to winning the Big Ten, narrowly qualifying for the Rose Bowl (where USC and Texas played for the national title), and ended the highly successful season with a marathon victory in the Orange Bowl, defeating Florida State in triple overtime.

The 2005 White Out edition of The Football Letter noted the second-largest Beaver Stadium attendance of 109,839 and featured photos of students camping outside the stadium in tents and Joe Paterno firing up fans at Rec Hall on Friday, at an event aptly titled, “Rally in the Valley” hosted by the Blue & White Society, the student membership of the Alumni Association.

The positive vibes flowed before and after the game, with editor John Black leading off that game’s edition of The Football Letter by writing:

“From the students camping out in what they called ‘Paternoville’ to the Friday night Rally in the Valley to the Saturday morning ESPN Game Day show (where Penn State fans jeered Lee Corso and Kirk Herbstreit for picking Ohio State) to the midnight wrap-up (where they chanted ‘Say You’re Sorry’), it was an All-Penn State Weekend.

Lowry spoke about the game, recalling vivid details and how much confidence the team had, especially coming off of the 2004 season, when they had the last-minute goal-line stand against Indiana and a blowout win over Michigan State.

Even though they were ranked lower, the Nittany Lions came into the game with a 5-0 record (the Buckeyes were 3-1), leading into one of the contests routinely mentioned when ranking the biggest games in Beaver Stadium history.

What continues to stand out the most about the atmosphere that night to Lowry?

“How loud it was,” he said.

“Conversations that we usually had defensively with each other on the field, we weren’t allowed to do that. It was so loud that it definitely played a factor in that game. They were sixth, we were sixteenth coming into that game, College Game Day was there, it was just one of those (games) that spring boarded us the rest of our season to accomplish one of the goals that we wanted to accomplish, which was be Big Ten champions; secondly try to get to the national championship. We fell one step short, but we finished it up with a BCS bowl game.”

Lowry recalled Ohio State having “tremendous talent all over the place,” when discussing the defense’s approach to shutting down the Buckeyes, and when you add in everything else, it’s no surprise that Lowry succinctly remarked, “It was one of those prototypical night primetime games.”

That description perfectly describes this Saturday’s tilt with Ohio State, with kickoff set for 7:30 p.m. on ABC. We’ll be tuning in like everyone else.

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Alan Zemaitis’ Sense of Service

Penn State letterman Alan Zemaitis is leading an inspiring community service initiative at Susquehanna University, called Season of Service. The former Penn State cornerback is an assistant coach at Susquehanna, which has had its season canceled because of COVID-19. Photo credit: Susquehanna University Athletics

Susquehanna University isn’t playing football this season, which means Penn State letterman Alan Zemaitis ’05 isn’t coaching this season, at least not on the field. But as Penn Staters know, coaches have an impact beyond the gridiron, and Zemaitis is embodying that sense of leadership with a community service project he’s spearheading.

The 2005 graduate who helped fuel the Nittany Lions’ 11-win season that year is an assistant coach with Susquehanna, which had its season canceled because of COVID-19.

He’s ensuring that the team stays busy, however, coordinating a town-gown collaboration with his players called Season of Service, which fans can read more about on Susquehanna’s website. One of the goals is to hopefully bridge racial divisions, and one of the early projects is to improve a nonprofit playground in the community and to engage with residents.

“The lack of football is an opportunity for us to get connected with the community,” Zemaitis said in the feature. “It’s the most diverse group at Susquehanna. We can be an example of what it means to work together. That’s how things get accomplished.”

The project is already underway, with Susquehanna sharing updates in a recent feature. We’ll be sure to ask Zemaitis about this project next month, when he’s scheduled to appear on The Football Letter Live.

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Penn Staters At The Next Level: Week 4

Penn State’s defensive line has been among the best units in the country in recent years. 

On Sunday, one former member of the “Wild Dogs” made his opening mark in the NFL. 

Yetur Gross-Matos, DE, Carolina Panthers

Gross-Matos has been working through a minor injury early this season and had struggled to make an impact through the first three weeks.

But he flashed his potential in the Panthers’ upset win over the Cardinals on Sunday. 

YGM came up with a big sack/forced fumble in the third quarter with Arizona driving into Carolina territory, displaying a great burst off the edge to blow by Cardinals left tackle D.J. Humphries.

He would finish the game with that sack/fumble and three total tackles. 

Sam Ficken, K, New York Jets

Photo by Steve Manuel


Look, the New York Jets aren’t very good. They’re probably the worst team in the league and look a safe bet to pick No. 1 in the NFL Draft next spring.

One glimmer of positivity for the Jets, however, is former Nittany Lion place kicker Sam Ficken.

Ficken made all five of his field goal attempts — including a season-long boot of 54-yards — and his lone extra point try. 

He nailed a 36-yard attempt in the 4th quarter to give his team a 28-27 before the Jets collapsed late in the game. 

Donovan Smith, OT, Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Photo By Steve Manuel

Donovan Smith anchored the left side of the Tampa Bay offensive line as the group protected QB Tom Brady almost perfectly on Sunday.

The Buccaneers offense put up 484 yards of total offense in a 38-31 win over the Chargers and Brady stayed clean in the pocket.

The Chargers defensive line, one of the better pass-rushing groups in the league, didn’t bring down Brady for a single sack thanks to Smith and his teammates up front. 

After an up-and-down first few games, Smith and the rest of Tampa’s offense is starting to gel, even with injuries to former Nittany Lion Chris Godwin and Leonard Fournette. 

Allen Robinson II, WR, Chicago Bears

We normally only highlight three Nittany Lions who had a standout week in the NFL, but Robinson II made that impossible. 

He’s now featured in our NFL recap three out of the first four weeks of the season. 

While Chicago’s offense was stagnant for much of the afternoon in its loss to Indianapolis, Robinson shined once more. 

ARob led his team in receiving yards again with 101 yards on seven receptions, marking his second-straight 100-yard game. 


He made a trademark leaping grab over a Colts defender late in the fourth quarter to give him his second touchdown grab of the season. 

Nittany Lions In The NFL
Baltimore Ravens (1): Trace McSorley
Buffalo Bills (1): Ryan Bates
Carolina Panthers (2): Yetur Gross-Matos
Chicago Bears (2): Jordan Lucas, Allen Robinson II
Dallas Cowboys (2): Sean Lee, Connor McGovern
Denver Broncos (2): DaeSean Hamilton, KJ Hamler 
Detroit Lions (3): Jason Cabinda, Jesse James, Amani Oruwariye
Green Bay Packers (1): Adrian Amos 
Houston Texans (1): John Reid 
Indianapolis Colts (1): Robert Windsor 
Las Vegas Raiders (2): Nick Bowers, Carl Nassib
Los Angeles Rams (1): Nick Scott
Miami Dolphins (1): Mike Gesicki
Minnesota Vikings (1): Dan Chisena 
New Orleans Saints (1): Blake Gillikin 
New York Giants (3): Saquon Barkley, Cam Brown, Austin Johnson
New York Jets (1): Sam Ficken, Chris Hogan, Ross Travis
Philadelphia Eagles (2): Miles Sanders, Trevor Williams 
Pittsburgh Steelers (1): Marcus Allen, Stefen Wisniewski 
San Francisco 49ers (2): Kevin Givens, Robbie Gould 
Tampa Bay Buccaneers (3): Chris Godwin, A.Q. Shipley, Donovan Smith 
Tennessee Titans (2): Jack Crawford, DaQuan Jones
Washington Football Team (1): Troy Apke 

Nittany Lions On NFL Coaching Staffs
Matt Rhule – Carolina Panthers Head Coach
Tom Bradley – Pittsburgh Steelers DBs Coach
Bobby Engram – Baltimore Ravens TEs Coach
Al Golden – Cincinnati Bengals LBs Coach
D’Anton Lynn – Houston Texans Secondary Coach
Mike Munchak – Denver Broncos OL Coach
Jeff Nixon – Carolina Panthers Senior Offensive Assistant

The Football Letter Live: Week 5

The Football Letter Live rolls on this evening, with the season’s fifth episode focusing on the Blue Band and the Alumni Blue Band.

Alumni and fans can register online or tune in on Facebook at 8 p.m. tonight. Penn Staters can also watch all previous season episodes on our website.

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Penn State’s Most Memorable Teams

Chances are good Daryll Clark and the 2008 Penn State squad will find a place on our list of Penn State’s most memorable teams. The team won the program’s third Big Ten title and finished the season in the Rose Bowl, narrowly missing a chance to play for the national championship after a late-season loss at Iowa. Photo credit: Steve Manuel.

Kickoff for Penn State’s opening game against Indiana is still weeks away, though chances are this season will remain memorable for many reasons, most of which being the bizarre circumstances that the Nittany Lions will play under.

That’s one way to elevate to “memorable” status,” though there are many others. Success certainly is a good option, with wins being just one way to define that word. The 2012 team that finished 8-4 instantly jumps to mind for obvious reasons.

Starting next month, we’ll rank Penn State’s most memorable teams over the years, and we’ll include insights from the letters that Ridge Riley ’32 and John Black ’62 authored as the Nittany Lions rose to national prominence over the second part of the 20th century. As much time as we’ve spent browsing them, there are still many lessons and stories that are worth uncovering for new generations of fans.

We’ll also speak with some of the lettermen who can share insights about what stood out about those teams: talent, chemistry, off-the-field stories that created bonds.

Fans know all about Penn State’s storied tradition, so there are plenty of teams to choose from. Have a suggestion for who should make the list? Drop us a line in the comments or tag us on Twitter at @PSUFBLetter.

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The Mental Cost

Penn State defensive end Shaka Toney (18) is hailed by coaches and teammates as having a high football IQ. That quality translates to off the field, too, with the standout bringing attention to the players’ mental health during relentless rumors. Photo by Steve Manuel.

Shaka Toney deserves a lot of credit. Let me tell you why.

First, here’s why Toney should already be on your radar. He’s distinguished himself as a standout along the defensive line, helping to create havoc with his wingspan, reach, and length. 

Toney has a ferocious drive, once registering four sacks in a single quarter, tying the program record in 2018 at Indiana. And coaches and teammates routinely mention Toney’s football IQ when describing why he’s so successful and so valuable to the Nittany Lions, both on and off the field. 

This is the quality that stood out recently, though you could easily argue that the sharp point Toney made goes well beyond football.

First, the background: Toney said this on what ended up being the day before the Big Ten announced that there’d be, after all, a fall season. And he said it amid an unrelenting media storm that featured nonstop inaccurate reports.

“Everyone only thinking about football. The rumors y’all keep putting out is destroying our mental health. Just let them announce it please. If you care about players in the B10 just wait for the answer.”

It’s not clear whether Toney was specifically referencing only the media or also fans, though either way, he’s absolutely right. And in line with his teammates who have participated in social justice rallies and marches this summer, or teammates who’ve promoted a safe return to campus on social media, Toney displayed an incredible level of leadership and maturity. 

No football this season would absolutely be devastating to a lot of individuals and businesses, many of whom are going to feel the effects anyway with no fans attending games, though the would-be impact would hit the student-athletes themselves the hardest. So, credit Toney for speaking up on an issue that some folks still are shy about discussing. Sometimes, it’s easy to recognize why. A quick scroll through the replies to Toney’s post reveals mostly positive responses, though there are a few that weren’t. 

Far and away the most thoughtful article I read during the past month was from Sports Illustrated columnist Matthew Stevens, who authored a selection titled, “The Big Ten Misinformation Campaign by ‘Content Creators’ Needs to End.”

Stevens threaded his column around the chaos caused by all the misreporting and general uncertainty surrounding the Big Ten’s final, not-so-final, decision to not play football this fall. That’s because when conference commissioner Kevin Warren said in August that the fall season was postponed and the decision wouldn’t be revisited, he meant the exact opposite. 

Give Warren and his colleagues credit in continuing to exhaust all options, though he could have said in August that’d be the plan. Here’s something I prepared in a few minutes. I think it would have worked:

Look, we’re in the middle of a global pandemic. We’re learning new information every day — every hour in some cases — so please give us a few weeks. In the meantime, we’re going to do everything we can to get our student-athletes competing this fall in a safe manner. As soon as we know more, we’ll let you know, and we’ll be as thorough and decisive as the medical facts will allow us to be. We’ll be transparent to cut down on any rumors, and the only official announcement you should believe will come from the conference offices.

How hard would that have been? Not very. 

Instead, the sweeping statement that sports wouldn’t be happening left a whole lot of folks wondering what was next, and when it would be announced. This is the part of the play where all the writers and reporters rush in with their Twitter accounts. 

Never mind that these scoops everyone was chasing were details everybody would learn eventually. Or that the reports changed so often it was difficult to know which ones to take seriously, if any.

The media deserves the lion’s share of criticism, though the Big Ten deserves some, too, for creating the mercurial scenario in the first place.  

Here’s the point: We heard for weeks on end that at the center of all the discussions were the student-athletes and their well-being. As Toney astutely pointed out, the players’ mental health certainly falls into that category. 

In some ways, it’s pointless trying to blame the media for creating and feeding into a frenzy when expecting anything less is like expecting an undersized running back to protect his quarterback from Micah Parsons. But this situation is worth pointing out for no other reason than we might see a replay next month. 

Yes, Penn State and the Big Ten are scheduled to play a nine-game season. Emphasis on scheduled. Numerous college football games have been postponed because of COVID-19, most recently, Notre Dame’s Saturday contest against Wake Forest. And locally in Happy Valley, State College High School won’t play its Friday night season-opener against Central Dauphin East. The school is still employing remote learning and has approved athletic competitions for contact sports only when in-person learning is taking place. You can read more on WTAJ’s website.

So, if we’re in a similar situation next month leading up to Penn State’s season opener on Oct. 24 — and believe me, I sincerely hope we’re not — with reports swirling about a possible postponement or other changes to the football schedule, let’s remember to act responsibly and with measure. 

It’s for the well-being of student-athletes at Penn State and all across the Big Ten. And after all, that’s what matters most.

Right?  

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Penn Staters At The Next Level: Week 1

Forty Penn Staters hold places on NFL rosters to start the 2020 season, which is good for fifth most in the nation. 

That’s also the most Nittany Lions on NFL rosters on opening weekend since at least 2006. 

Here’s a quick rundown of the standout performers from Week 1 and check the end of this blog for the full list of Penn Staters playing and coaching at the next level.

Allen Robinson II, WR, Chicago Bears 

A-Rob had a fruitful opening day performance in the Bears’ comeback win over the Detroit Lions. Robinson II posted five receptions for 74 yards, including this excellent grab to put his team in the red zone late in the third quarter. 

Feel like we’ve seen a catch or two like that before from him.

Trip Down Memory Lane: Allen Robinson II hauls in big pass in 4-OT win over Michigan in 2013. 

Allen Robinson outleaps defensive back to haul in 36-yard pass in final seconds to set up Lions’ final touchdown in regulation time Steve Manuel/The Football Letter

Chris Godwin, WR, Tampa Bay Buccaneers 

Godwin was targeted a team-high seven times by Tampa Bay’s new quarterback Tom Brady and recorded six catches for 79 yards. Big things are expected from Godwin this season after a breakout 2019 campaign, and Week 1 did little to diminish that. As he and Brady continue to develop their rapport, expect Godwin’s statlines to only get bigger and better. 

Trip Down Memory Lane: Chris Godwin goes off for monster performance in Rose Bowl. 

Chris Godwin had a record-setting showing in the 2017 Rose Bowl Game – Steve Manuel/The Football Letter

John Reid, CB, Houston Texans

While the Texans fell to the defending Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs on opening night, Reid made a strong impression in his first career game. Reid finished fourth on the team with six tackles and was credited with a quarterback pressure when sent on a blitz from the secondary. 
Trip Down Memory Lane: John Reid’s pick-six fuels big second half for Penn State against Buffalo.

John Reid provided turning a point in the game with his pick-six early in third quarter – Steve Manuel/The Football Letter

Nittany Lions In The NFL
Baltimore Ravens (1): Trace McSorley
Buffalo Bills (1): Ryan Bates
Carolina Panthers (2): Yetur Gross-Matos, Shareef Miller 
Chicago Bears (2): Jordan Lucas, Allen Robinson II
Dallas Cowboys (2): Sean Lee, Connor McGovern
Denver Broncos (2): DaeSean Hamilton, KJ Hamler 
Detroit Lions (3): Jason Cabinda, Jesse James, Amani Oruwariye
Green Bay Packers (1): Adrian Amos 
Houston Texans (1): John Reid 
Indianapolis Colts (1): Robert Windsor 
Las Vegas Raiders (2): Nick Bowers, Carl Nassib
Los Angeles Rams (1): Nick Scott
Miami Dolphins (1): Mike Gesicki
Minnesota Vikings (1): Dan Chisena 
New Orleans Saints (1): Blake Gillikin 
New York Giants (3): Saquon Barkley, Cam Brown, Austin Johnson
New York Jets (1): Sam Ficken, Chris Hogan, Ross Travis
Philadelphia Eagles (2): Miles Sanders, Trevor Williams 
Pittsburgh Steelers (1): Marcus Allen, Stefen Wisniewski 
San Francisco 49ers (2): Kevin Givens, Robbie Gould 
Tampa Bay Buccaneers (3): Chris Godwin, A.Q. Shipley, Donovan Smith 
Tennessee Titans (2): Jack Crawford, DaQuan Jones
Washington Football Team (1): Troy Apke 

Safety Troy Apke brings down Buckeye receiver K.J. Hill – Steve Manuel/The Football Letter

Nittany Lions On NFL Coaching Staffs
Matt Rhule – Carolina Panthers Head Coach
Tom Bradley – Pittsburgh Steelers DBs Coach
Bobby Engram – Baltimore Ravens TEs Coach
Al Golden – Cincinnati Bengals LBs Coach
D’Anton Lynn – Houston Texans Secondary Coach
Mike Munchak – Denver Broncos OL Coach
Jeff Nixon – Carolina Panthers Senior Offensive Assistant
Bill O’Brien (Head Coach 2012-13) – Houston Texans Head Coach