PENN STATE PREVIEW: AUBURN

Each week, we’ll tell you what to expect, what to keep an eye on, and where and when you can catch the Nittany Lions this football season.

Game details: No. 10/12 Penn State (2-0) vs No. 22/20 Auburn (2-0). 7:30 p.m. ET kick-off, broadcast on ABC.

Venue: Beaver Stadium

Weather Forecast (via AccuWeather): Humid with some sun; fog in the morning, then a stray t-shower in the afternoon. High of 80.

The Line: Penn State -6.5

All-Time Series: This is the third matchup between the two schools, with each splitting wins in the previous two meetings.

Last Meeting: Penn State fell 13-9 against the Tigers in the 2002 Capital One Bowl. Robbie Gould hit three field goals for the Nittany Lions.

Throwback Classic (1995): In the 1995 Outback Bowl, Penn State crushed Auburn, 43-14 behind quarterback Wally Richardson. Wally threw for four touchdown passes while Bobby Engram recorded four catches for 113 yards and two touchdowns.

Last Week: Penn State topped Ball State in the Lions’ home opener, 44-13. Auburn, meanwhile, crushed FCS foe Alabama State, 62-0.

Photos by Steve Manuel/The Football Letter

The Lead: What an atmosphere we’ve got brewing in Happy Valley. White Out. Game Day. SEC opponent. Primetime. If you love college football, it doesn’t get much better than this. Both teams come into this game with a lot of momentum, having started each of their seasons at 2-0. The Nittany Lions have certainly faced the tougher opposition compared to the Tigers, picking up wins over then-No. 12 Wisconsin on the road before a convincing home win over defending MAC Champs Ball State last week. Auburn dispatched Akron and Alabama State with ease in the first two weeks but Penn State will obviously be a much bigger test for first-year head coach Bryan Harsin.

Penn State Wins If: The Nittany Lions can win the big play and turnover battle. There’s not much that gets a home crowd going more than big plays on offensive and forced turnovers on defense. James Franklin always preaches about the need to win the explosive play battle and finish on the plus side in the turnover margin. Penn State has done just that in the opening two weeks and it’s set them up for success. Much like Sean Clifford, Tigers signal caller Bo Nix is an experienced quarterback with plenty of big game experience. He won’t be easily rattled by the electric atmosphere inside Beaver Stadium. Though, if Arnold Ebiketie and the rest of the Penn State defensive line can get pressure and force him to make decisions quicker than he’d like to, that bodes well for the Nittany Lions with the terrific secondary that they employ.

Auburn Wins If: Bo Nix balls out. As mentioned above, Bo Nix is not a stranger to playing on the road in hostile environments. Heck, he’s had to do it just about every week in the SEC the past two years as Auburn’s starting quarterback. He’s going to need to be at his best if Auburn is going to pull off the road upset. If the blocking holds up well up front for Auburn and Nix is afforded the time and space to able to create with his arm and his legs, the Tigers can move the ball against this stingy Nittany Lions defense. Then, if Nix and Auburn can capitalize on those drives by getting into the end zone, the Tigers certainly have what it takes to win this game. Much was expected of Nix upon his arrival as a freshman, it hasn’t quite lived up to those expectations. But there’s no bigger and better showcase for you to re-announce yourself to the college football world than this Saturday’s showdown.

Count On: A few false start penalties for Auburn. Yes, yes, Auburn players have certainly played in environments that were loud before. Still, it really doesn’t matter your experience level, noise makes a difference for communication on offense. I’m not saying the crowd will be why the Tigers lose the game, but a few early-game jitters where the blue and white fans hollering at full volume will result in a few penalties for the Tigers offense.

Keep An Eye On: Noah Cain. The Penn State running game hasn’t fully clicked into gear yet, but it looks to be building each week. Cain had a productive day last week against Ball State (69 yards rushing and a touchdown). Look for him to carry that over to this week’s game. The Nittany Lions will need him against this SEC front seven.

Trivia Tidbit: This is Auburn’s first Big Ten road game since 1931. That’s before the SEC was even formed.

Predictions:

John Patishnock: Penn State 42, Auburn 13

Vincent Lungaro: Penn State 38, Auburn 24

Fitting into the Family

Senior defensive end Arnold Ebiketie (17) has had an immediate impact for Penn State, blocking a field goal and recording a sack in Madison a few weeks ago. Photo credit: Steve Manuel

It didn’t take long for Arnold Ebiketie to have an impact this season for Penn State.

How long? Exactly one snap.

“I looked over after the first play and saw he made a play, and then the next series he made a play. I was like, ‘He’s really good,'” PJ Mustipher said shortly after the Nittany Lions earned a 16-10 season-opening win at Wisconsin on Sept. 4. “For him to come out there, first game in Big Ten football, shoutout to AK.”

Ebiketie, or “AK” as he known to many of his teammates and coaches, recorded a sack and provided one of the most critical plays by blocking a field goal in the season-opening victory over the Badgers. Through two games, he’s helped the Nittany Lions limit their opponents to a total of 23 points.

Mustipher, a senior defensive tackle and team captain, added: “He’s fast. You can’t teach speed, and I don’t think you can stop speed. … He was able to use that to his advantage. … He made a lot of plays, so I’m proud of him.”

A senior defensive end, Ebiketie transferred from Temple late last year. There’s a lot to like about Ebiketie, who played high school football in Maryland before becoming a standout for Temple from 2017-20. He earned second-team conference honors last year, when he led the Owls in tackles for loss (8.5), sacks (4), and forced fumbles (3).

“When he came in, it just felt like he fit our family,” said senior linebacker Ellis Brooks, who added that what stands out to him the most is Ebiketie’s attitude and work ethic. “He comes to work every single day at practice. You can tell he’s really getting himself prepared to play Saturday.”

Ebiketie, who was born in Cameroon, a country in Central Africa, is majoring in recreation, parks, and tourism management. On the field, he wrecks havoc, which along with his intangibles, has earned him credibility and respect on the team. There’s also a seemingly easy-going side of Ebiketie, or at least a different side. After Saturday’s win over Ball State, he celebrated with students in Nittanyville and with young fans who lined the south tunnel to see the Nittany Lions walk off the field and into the locker room.

“He’s an awesome young man,” James Franklin said this week. “He’s very appreciative of the experience that he’s having at Penn State. He’s always got a huge smile on his face. He’s a mature young man. He’s great with his teammates, but he’s also got a really good way with the staff. He understands how to live in both of those worlds and do it in a way that’s very relatable and respected. He’s obviously a very talented football player that’s got a bright future.”

Ebiketie was a notable transfer for Penn State and has erased any sort of drop-off that might be expected after the Nittany Lions had two defensive ends selected in this year’s NFL Draft (Ofade Oweh and Shaka Toney). Teammates jokingly teased Ebiketie that playing in the Big Ten would be different, though he’s clearly been ready from the start.

Franklin noted that Ebiketie was a good player when he arrived, and he believes Ebiketie has only gotten better by working with defensive line coach John Scott Jr. and with grad assistant Deion Barnes. By putting in work in the weight room and focusing on his body composition and nutrition, Ebikeite “has really developed in the time that he’s been on campus,” Franklin said.

You can check out the video below to see Ebiketie talking about the need to continuing to work. This was after he had a breakout game against the Badgers in his first contest for Penn State. You get the sense that Ebiketie was destined to always be a Nittany Lion, to always play in Happy Valley, with how seamlessly he’s adjusted to life at Penn State, where Franklin has always advocated having a family atmosphere, one where sons and daughters, brothers and sisters sit alongside players and coaches and share in the experience.

“He’s very coachable, and I know Coach Pry and the defensive staff just have a ton of trust in him and how he plays,” Franklin said. “We love him, he’s been a great pick up. We had victory Monday meal last night at Pollock (Commons), and he was there with my wife and kids, laughing and telling stories. We’re very happy to have him.”

For more on The Football Letter, including online archives (requires Alumni Association member log-in), click here.

Not yet an Alumni Association member? Click here.

Follow the Football Letter on Twitter for more videos, photos, and features.

PENN STATE PREVIEW: BALL STATE

Penn State at Wisconsin. Penn State 16 – Wisconsin 10. Photo by Steve Manuel

Each week, we’ll tell you what to expect, what to keep an eye, and where and when you can catch the Nittany Lions this football season.

Game details: No. 11/13 Penn State (1-0) vs. Ball State (0-1). 3:30 p.m. kickoff (ET), broadcast on FS1.

Venue: Beaver Stadium, where fans will be in attendance for a game for the first time since Nov. 30, 2019, a 27-6 win over Rutgers.

Weather forecast (via Accuweather): Mostly sunny with a high of 74 degrees. Near perfect weather for a day of tailgating. and football.

The line: Penn State – 22.5

All-time series: This is the first-ever meeting between the Nittany Lions and Cardinals.

Last meeting: N/A

Throwback classic (2009): Without a game to relive between these two opponents, I took a quick look back at Penn State’s second game of the 2009 season, a 28-7 win over Syracuse. Senior quarterback Darryl Clark passed for 240 yards and tossed a couple of touchdowns as the Nittany Lions cruised to an out-of-conference win.

Last week: Penn State went on the road and picked up a huge road win over then-No. 12 Wisconsin at Camp Randall.

The lead: Penn State returns home after that huge victory in Madison to face the defending MAC Champions, Ball State. While the Cardinals aren’t quite the level of opposition as the Badgers were, this Week Two contest won’t be a cakewalk by any stretch of the imagination for the Nittany Lions. Ball State returns 21 starters from last year’s conference title winning team, including second-team All-MAC quarterback Drew Pitt. Penn State head coach James Franklin said in his weekly press conference that he does believe in the idea of “trap games,” and this game would certainly fit that bill. It makes his “1-0” mantra extra important this week. Don’t expect Penn State to look past the Cardinals after that win over Wisconsin and next week’s White Out showdown with Auburn looming — it’s just not in their DNA.

Penn State at Wisconsin. Penn State 16 – Wisconsin 10. Photo by Steve Manuel

Penn State wins if: the Nittany Lions avoid mistakes. Penn State played turnover-free football last week and if that trend continues, it should see off any potential upset from Ball State. Sean Clifford and the offense grew into the game a week ago and most importantly avoided turnovers. If they pick up where they left off, the home fans will leave happy.

Ball State wins if: Penn State’s turnover woes from a year ago return and the defense’s performance last week can’t be duplicated. The Cardinals come into this one with plenty of confidence that they can walk away with a win. The last thing the Nittany Lions want to do is make mistakes and feed into the Cardinals’ belief.

Count on: A raucous atmosphere inside Beaver Stadium. It’s been 651 days (We think we did the math right!) since fans of the blue and white got to see their in action at home. As James Franklin tweeted throughout the week, this is going to be one big family reunion. It might not reach the levels of noise and excitement as next week’s game with Auburn, but it will still be a ton of fun. We’re jazzed up to see the return of tailgates, team arrival, the Blue Band performing pre-game and at halftime, and all that makes Saturdays in Happy Valley the best show in college football.

Keep an eye on: the Penn State running game. The Nittany Lions struggled to run the ball against Wisconsin’s stout front seven last week. Expect offensive coordinator Mike Yurcich to try and get Noah Cain and the rest of the Lawn Boyz going early. If Penn State can run more effectively this week, it should open up the passing game a lot more for Sean Clifford and co.

Trivia tidbit: Penn State snapped Wisconsin’s 25-game home opener win streak with the victory in Madison in Week One.

Predictions:

John Patishnock: Penn State 38, Ball State 17
Vincent Lungaro: Penn State 33, Ball State 20

For more on The Football Letter, including online archives (requires Alumni Association member log-in), click here.

Not yet an Alumni Association member? Click here.

Follow the Football Letter on Twitter for more videos, photos, and features.

Leading With Emotion

This is the fun part. After all the preparation, all the early mornings and late nights, all the meetings and film sessions and everything else that transforms coaching into a 24-hour-a-day marathon, James Franklin wanted to let loose. He’s apt to do this after victories, and for good reason.

He’s an emotional guy. He’s acknowledged multiple times in the past, embraces it. This who he is. Why run from it or hide it?

So, after Penn State knocked off the 12th-ranked team in the nation on the road on Saturday afternoon, the Penn State head coach went looking for fans to celebrate with. He didn’t have to go far, just to the first few rows of Camp Randall Stadium, home of the Wisconsin Badgers.

The video above shows Franklin sharing his exuberance with alumni and fans who converged on Madison this past weekend. I asked him about this earlier today during his weekly press conference, and specifically, how big of a role does emotion play in his approach to coaching, especially when it comes to connecting with fans, players, and players’ families.

Here’s what he said:

“I think it’s a huge part of my leadership style with our players and how we meet, how we lead, how we bond as coaches and players. I think it’s a big part. It’s my personality, my style, and I have to be authentic and true to who I am in my leadership role.”

If you’re fortunate to be in the first few rows after a Penn State football win, chances are good you’ll get to celebrate with James Franklin up close. Photo credit: Steve Manuel

Franklin referenced the recruiting process with senior star wideout Jahan Dotson, who caught five passes for 102 yards and a touchdown against Wisconsin. “Getting to know his family well and understanding the successes and challenges and adversity we all go through in our families, being a part of that is meaningful to me and important to me,” Franklin said.

The head coach also mentioned receiving a text message from Nittany Lion standout quarterback Trace McSorley earlier this morning. Point being: connections are important, perhaps just as important as anything else, and creating and maintaining those connections is critical.

Some fans Franklin knows well, some he recognizes. Either by a prior meeting, or sometimes from the wardrobe. Looks matter after all, and if you dress the part, Franklin will notice.

“The gentlemen with the white fedora on Saturday. I don’t know him very well, but I see him at all the games. I feel his passion. I appreciate his passion. He’s also handsomely dressed usually, and I appreciate all those things. When there is an opportunity to connect and show my passion and appreciation for them as well, because they’re a part of our family and process, I want them to feel that as well.”

P.S. The fan rocking the fedora is Cameron Panase, who graduated last year and was the president of Nittanyville during his senior season.

For more on The Football Letter, including online archives (requires Alumni Association member log-in), click here.

Not yet an Alumni Association member? Click here.

Follow the Football Letter on Twitter for more videos, photos, and features.

Wednesday Night Lights

James Franklin and the Nittany Lions continued fall camp at Beaver Stadium on Wednesday night. Franklin said the team will practice at the stadium again Saturday, mirroring the game day routine at Madison for the Sept. 4 opener against Wisconsin, including going through the pregame meal and walkthrough. Photo credit: John Patishnock

The aura of Beaver Stadium is always there. Always. Even when the place is nearly empty. Actually, perhaps especially when it’s nearly empty.

That was the scene around 9 p.m. Wednesday night as Penn State was finishing practice and the media portion was waiting to start. The photo above was taken from the north side of the stadium, right at the back of the end zone. From there, you could look out and imagine all the great plays and noteworthy Nittany Lions who have elevated the program to where it is today.

Today, Penn State’s ranked again in the AP preseason poll and is nearing the end of fall camp, which means gearing up for the first game week of the season. Following the work out — which the media saw for the first 20 minutes — head coach James Franklin said that the team would practice at the stadium again Saturday in preparation for the season opener at Wisconsin on Sept. 4. It’ll be an 11 a.m. local kick, and Franklin said the Nittany Lions will mirror the game day routine. That’ll include the pregame meal and walkthrough, and then the team will scrimmage at Beaver Stadium at the exact time that the game will kick in Madison to help the players’ body clocks get acclimated.

For someone’s who as dedicated to details as Franklin, that shouldn’t be surprising. You can watch Franklin’s entire post-practice presser below, courtesy of Penn State Athletics.

Along with Franklin, tight ends coach and letterman Ty Howle, tight end Brenton Strange, and safety Jaquan Brisker also chatted about the progress the team’s made so far in camp. I asked Howle if he’s had much of a chance to talk with fellow lettermen who are back with the team in coaching roles, and if so, if he’s noticed certain themes that bond lettermen from different generations.

“Absolutely,” said Howle, who mentioned a few times how much he’s thrilled to be back at his alma mater. You can watch Howle’s media availability below, also courtesy of Penn State Athletics, and my interaction with him begins shortly after the 6:00 mark.

For more on The Football Letter, including online archives (requires Alumni Association member log-in), click here.

Not yet an Alumni Association member? Click here.

Penn State Football Playlist

As promised, we’ve been bringing alumni and fans plenty of video coverage as Penn State gears up for the 2021 campaign, and this will continue all season long.

The video above features sights from media day earlier this month. We take fans onto the field at Beaver Stadium, have some interviews, and then head over to Lasch for the second practice of fall camp.

One of the most popular videos we’ve shared so far features associate head coach and letterman Terry Smith ’91 from media day. Smith eloquently described the impact that Penn State’s had on his family, and how that legacy continues with the current roster, as his nephew Tank’s on the team as a sophomore running back. You can view that video of Smith on our Twitter account.

The video of Smith was incredibly popular with Penn Staters, as the video surpassed 250,000 impressions on our Twitter account. I’m the first one to acknowledge that numbers don’t always tell the entire story, though that one felt like it was worth sharing.

We also chatted with defensive coordinator Brent Pry, who’s quickly becoming a fixture in Happy Valley, as he’s going into his eighth season, having arrived with James Franklin in 2014. In addition to Smith, several more letterman have joined the coaching staff or have been hired in other roles, such as Alan Zemaitis ’05, who returned to his alma mater earlier this year as an assistant recruiting coordinator. Alan, or “AZ,” as he’s called by his nickname, has contributed right away.

You can check out the video below to hear Pry’s perspective on what it means to have several lettermen back with the program.

You can watch more of our conversations with Smith and Pry on our YouTube page, which will feature some of the longer-form videos that don’t fit within Twitter’s time limitation.

Other videos we’ve shared to social include a slow tilt of Beaver Stadium on an early-morning summer day, and weekly hype videos that count down to Penn State’s season opener. Here’s the one we posted this morning, signaling that the season opener is two weeks away.

As a reminder, you can bookmark our 2021 YouTube playlist, which we’ll be updating regularly throughout the fall. We’ll have at least a few hundred posted by the end of the season, and most likely more.

For more on The Football Letter, including online archives (requires Alumni Association member log-in), click here.

Not yet an Alumni Association member? Click here.

PENN STATE FOOTBALL MEDIA DAY: CATCHING UP WITH ASSOCIATE HEAD COACH AND LETTERMAN TERRY SMITH ’91

Letterman Terry Smith ’91 is one of several former Nittany Lion players on James Franklin’s staff for the 2021 season.
Image Credit: Penn State Athletics/Mark Selders

As Penn State gears up for another season, where stars like Jahan Dotson and Jaquan Brisker will look to cement their legacies in Penn State history, there is also plenty of that history on the Nittany Lions’ coaching staff in the form of former lettermen.

Players who spent their college careers suiting up for the blue and white, running out of the same tunnel Dotson, Brisker, and the rest of the 2021 team will go through in a few weeks for the home opener against Ball State. 

James Franklin has built a staff from his connections from all over the college football world, but he’s also recognized the importance of Penn Staters who have a deep connection to the program from their time as players. 

Former lettermen on Franklin’s staff include Terry Smith (associate head coach/cornerbacks coach), Ty Howle (tight ends coach), Deion Barnes (graduate assistant), Wendy Laurent (assistant offensive line coach) and Alan Zemaitis (assistant recruiting coordinator). 

Going into his eighth season as a member of the coaching staff, Smith was of course a standout receiver for the Nittany Lions from 1988-91.  

I caught up with Terry at the team’s Media Day on Saturday to talk about the importance of having Penn State lettermen as a part of the staff, what he learned going through the COVID-altered 2020 season, and more. 

As always, thanks to Terry for taking the time to chat. 

What did you learn about yourself as a coach going through such an altered season last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic? 

TS: “You just had to learn to do things a different way, to teach a different way. Whether that was Zoom or just teaching at a distance like we’re talking right now. It really helped me realize that you don’t have to do things a certain way just because that’s the way you’ve done them your whole life. I think that helped our program change some things and do some things a different way. That’s going to help us advance in the future.”

Does the team’s process of preparation have to change at all knowing your opening up the season against a Big Ten opponent? 

TS: “No, our process is the same. Each week we’re trying to go 1-0. That opponent who is first, they’re the most important part of our focus. Training camp right now is to make sure we have a foundation set for the season. Whether it’s Wisconsin or someone else, all our focus is going on 1-0 to start things off.” 

How would you assess the cornerbacks group that you’re working with this season? 

TS: “I feel really good about the whole back end of the defensive backfield. With the corners, I feel like I have a lot of depth. There’s six guys that have played a lot of college football, including Johnny Dixon, who played at South Carolina. I’m excited for the competition this camp and we’ll let the field sort through all of that. Especially excited for Tariq Castro-Fields, who’s played a ton of football here and has been successful. Joey Porter had a breakout year last year. Daequan Hardy is our returning starter at the star spot. There’s a lot of guys competing to get back on that playing field. No job is given. They all have to earn it.” 

Image Credit: Penn State Athletics/Mark Selders

How important is it to have guys like yourself, Deion Barnes and Ty Howle on staff, who have been a part of this program as players and might understand what it means to play here just a little bit more? 

TS: “It’s essential. We’re former Penn State lettermen. Who knows this program better than us? We played on this field at Beaver Stadium. We walked those same paths in the hallway and the locker room. We can tell players what Penn State can offer from personal experiences. I like to give my testimony: my dad went here and is a ’68 grad, I’m a ’91 grad, my son was an ’07 grad, my daughter Haley is here in the WorkLink program, my nephew (sophomore running back) Tank Smith is on the team. Penn State is a great place and my family is a testimony of how great Penn State is. When you come to Penn State, it’s a 40-year decision, not just a four-year decision.”

You mentioned Tank, what’s it like to have him a part of the team and getting to be around him as he gets his own experience within Penn State?

TS: “My nephew, he’s doing a great job over there (on offense). He knows his role on this team and understands it really well. He’s a major contributor for us. I’m happy for him and happy he’s here.”

Continuing to connect alumni to the football program

Penn State opens the 2021 season at Wisconsin on Saturday, Sept. 4. The game is scheduled for a noon (ET) kickoff. Photo credit: John Patishnock

It’s August in Happy Valley. Finally. It’s that time of year.

The significance of the upcoming football season has created even more excitement than usual, with fans returning to Beaver Stadium and the promise of another potential run at the Big Ten title for the Nittany Lions. Of course, that’s for fans to discuss. James Franklin and his team are focused on getting 1 percent better every day, and when you look at the results during Franklin’s tenure in Happy Valley, that approach has worked. Part philosophical, part logistical, with an emphasis on laser focus on the task at hand.

For the team, that next task is the start of fall practice for the 2021 season, happening today. Then tomorrow, Franklin and the team’s three coordinators will each address the state of the program and answer questions during the team’s annual media day at Beaver Stadium.

Everything’s set to start around lunchtime, with on-field interviews afterward with nearly everyone in the program available for Q&As. The on-field interviews are one of my favorite times of the year. Players are certainly focused, though there’s also an inherently relaxed feel. Have an off-beat question for a player, such as “What’s your favorite restaurant in town,” or “Who’s the best dancer on the team?” Media day is the time to ask. Those really aren’t the types of questions you ask players when the team is preparing to play Ohio State or Michigan.

Still, there’s plenty of chances to gain real insight, often in 1-on-1 or small-group settings with the players and coaches. It’s also an opportunity to introduce yourself and see how much the players enjoy spending time with another. There’s joking, usually lots of smiles, and you also need to keep an eye out if you’re handling a camera. Sometimes players will try to playfully distract a teammate during an interview by squeezing a water bottle nearby. Seriously, it’s happened more than once.

We’ve got plenty planned for you this fall with The Football Letter. John Black ’62 will share his invaluable insight each week in the member-benefit Monday email, and world-class photographer Steve Manuel ’82, ’92g is behind the lens again this fall, capturing images that bring John’s words to life. We’re also continuing the game day email sent each Saturday to members and nonmembers, and that’ll include a game preview, that week’s episode of The Football Letter Live — which will be hosted by myself and our CEO Paul Clifford ’20g — and other exclusive features from the blog.

Also worth noting: We’re adding significant video coverage this year, starting at media day and continuing throughout the season. We’ll take you onto the field and show you what it feels like to be at Beaver Stadium on game day, share interview clips, and highlight why Penn State football is so special, for many reasons both on and off the field. My colleague and former Daily Collegian sportswriter Vince Lungaro ’18 will be onsite at media day, along with myself, John and Steve, so keep an eye on our channels this weekend and in the coming weeks for all the sights and sounds.

Speaking of The Football Letter Live, you can now register for the entire season’s worth of shows, for free. Sign up today on our website, and you can click the Guest Lineup tab to see the schedule. Some of Penn State’s all-time great players will be on, along with inspiring volunteer leaders. We’re introducing a new virtual platform, which allows us to have a running ticker and on-screen banners, and there are a lot of fun times in store on all of The Football Letter channels this fall.

The opportunities extend beyond Happy Valley, as we’re hosting a free pregame event at each of the team’s five away games. Registration is free and also required, and you can learn more and sign up today. Whether it’s virtual or on the road, or if you’re replying to or sharing one of our social media posts, we hope to see and hear from our alumni this football season. Penn State football unites our Nittany Lion global community, so everything is all the more special if you’re along for the ride.

For more on The Football Letter, including online archives (requires Alumni Association member log-in), click here.

Not yet an Alumni Association member? Click here.